View Full Version : I got forced to vote...seriously



EmmaB
23-10-2008, 11:46 AM
I didn't even know that October 14 was a voting day until my fiancees stepmother came running into the house and packed us into her car. I thought I was getting kidnapped until we pulled up in front of the senior home. Needless to say, it was a very interesting experience!

How was it the first time you voted?

ewomack
23-10-2008, 06:37 PM
Well... I wasn't exactly forced like you... wow... that's a democratic experience... :P

Ummm... I honestly can't remember the first time I voted... it must have been fabulous...

Atom
25-10-2008, 01:06 AM
I walked in and up to a lady at the desk, she gave me a dirty look because I had long hair then asked me my name, I turned around and walked out. That was my first and only voting experience. That was about 36 years ago, I was 18 y/o.

Rhiannon
25-10-2008, 09:12 AM
I havent voted yet as we havent had an election, but its part of being an Aussie and something that we have to do.

ewomack
25-10-2008, 03:41 PM
When are the Australian elections?

StrongInTheArm
04-11-2008, 11:23 AM
I've voted every time I've had a chance. In my opinion you are not entitled to moan about politics and/or politicians unless you are prepared to do your duty and get involved. Once you have you can bitch and whine about those in power all you want, it's like you get a license or a free Bitching Pass. :D

Zap
04-11-2008, 12:39 PM
I've voted every time I've had a chance. In my opinion you are not entitled to moan about politics and/or politicians unless you are prepared to do your duty and get involved. Once you have you can bitch and whine about those in power all you want, it's like you get a license or a free Bitching Pass. :D

Completely agree with you on that.
If you choose not to vote, then you choose not to be bothered with the outcome.

Atom
04-11-2008, 01:07 PM
I've voted every time I've had a chance. In my opinion you are not entitled to moan about politics and/or politicians unless you are prepared to do your duty and get involved. Once you have you can bitch and whine about those in power all you want, it's like you get a license or a free Bitching Pass. :DI've never heard such crap in my life, Sita. You sound as brain washed as most Americans FFS.

StrongInTheArm
04-11-2008, 06:52 PM
Atom there is nothing wrong with disliking the system and even wanting to change it, but in a democracy the only legitimate way to do it is from within. Or do you want to go all French on the US government and have a people's revolution?

You think there is something wrong then convince a majority. That is how a democracy works.

You know I'm not American right. ;)

Atom
04-11-2008, 07:08 PM
Hmm.. I just realized something, this is not the thread I should have posted that comment in, the OP isn't even referring to an American election. Sorry about that. :emb:

I guess I got all caught up in the posts over at v7.


Well' I don't really want to see the current system changed, I want to see it defeated, then when it's defunct, start over.

Do you think that is too radical under the circumstances?

Atom
04-11-2008, 07:13 PM
We've had at least 50 years to change it but it's only gotten more corrupt.

Atom
04-11-2008, 07:16 PM
I'm thinking that the way to defeat it is withdraw from it, one at a time if need be, until the power is removed. What do you think? Too radical?

ewomack
05-11-2008, 09:53 AM
What are the general reactions to the US elections in Canada? Apart from the ones we'll hear in the news, that is...

Zap
05-11-2008, 10:00 AM
Many of us are hoping the the US will get back on track.
I've heard of "Welcome Back America" parties being thrown here and there.

StrongInTheArm
06-11-2008, 01:21 PM
Hmm.. I just realized something, this is not the thread I should have posted that comment in, the OP isn't even referring to an American election. Sorry about that. :emb:

I guess I got all caught up in the posts over at v7.


Well' I don't really want to see the current system changed, I want to see it defeated, then when it's defunct, start over.

Do you think that is too radical under the circumstances?

Well it's an objective, every political movement must have objectives. My way of thinking is, you can only change such a system by winning power first.

That means democratic elections and persuading a majority of people to think like you do. (In fact for constitutional change, which is what I think you are talking about, the American system requires a much bigger majority, so gaining power is only the first step in persuading people. Considering how difficult it is to pass constitutional amendments, I would say you have your work cut out for you.)

It might be easier to create your own colony somewhere and live by your own laws. Buy an island with like minded people dude.

StrongInTheArm
06-11-2008, 01:23 PM
I'm thinking that the way to defeat it is withdraw from it, one at a time if need be, until the power is removed. What do you think? Too radical?

See my previous post, you need political power, the withdrawal method is not going to work. ;)

Atom
06-11-2008, 09:19 PM
Well it's an objective, every political movement must have objectives. My way of thinking is, you can only change such a system by winning power first.

That means democratic elections and persuading a majority of people to think like you do. (In fact for constitutional change, which is what I think you are talking about, the American system requires a much bigger majority, so gaining power is only the first step in persuading people. Considering how difficult it is to pass constitutional amendments, I would say you have your work cut out for you.)Ok.


It might be easier to create your own colony somewhere and live by your own laws. Buy an island with like minded people dude.I don't care for the ocean. I'll have to buy a mountain or something.

Atom
06-11-2008, 09:21 PM
See my previous post, you need political power, the withdrawal method is not going to work. ;)You are probably right. :|

Junctiongirl
07-03-2009, 04:11 PM
I voted when I turned 18 and every election after that, I have never missed an election :) I'm originally from a former communist country and will never take democracy and a RIGHT to vote for granted.

Zap
07-03-2009, 08:04 PM
I voted when I turned 18 and every election after that, I have never missed an election :) I'm originally from a former communist country and will never take democracy and a RIGHT to vote for granted.

I've been to Moscow and Tashkent.
Are either of those cities in your home country? :)

Junctiongirl
07-03-2009, 09:19 PM
Yes, I'm Russian :) You have friends in Tashkent? I'm from Kamchatka

Zap
07-03-2009, 11:27 PM
My wife is a Russian from Tashkent. :)

Junctiongirl
09-03-2009, 08:14 PM
Does she miss home? I'm very nostalgic...

Zap
09-03-2009, 09:32 PM
Does she miss home? I'm very nostalgic...

Sometimes. But she doesn't miss the city, just her family.
She's been back twice since she moved here 7 years ago.

LanguageStudioCanada
05-04-2009, 05:47 PM
thats funny:)
I personally dont see any point in voting...people may accuse me of passiveness...but whats the point of it, if THEY already figured out who, when and where will win...:)

jacoblied
02-12-2009, 05:46 AM
getting forced to vote is not constitutional!

boomsticks53
30-07-2010, 04:42 AM
wow getting forced to vote is hilarious at this age when we see everyone ranting about freedom of expression n choice....hypocriisy

ahakh
19-09-2010, 11:21 PM
i never voted and never will.